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New Sport Thought Thursday Chicago Cubs and Wrigley Field


In this Sport Thought Thursday, we are going to get into the debate on the Chicago Cubs and Wrigley Field.  We are going to review the history of Chicago Cubs and Wrigley Field.  I do not think that the general baseball fan know they both have different history.  Let us get into this debate.

Chicago Cubs History

The history of Chicago Cubs started as Chicago White Stockings in 1870 by defeating the St Louis Unions.  In 1876, the White Stockings join the newly formed league known as the National League.  In 1907 and 1908, the Chicago Cubs became the first team in Major Baseball League to win back to back World Series.  They beat the Ty Cobb’s Detroit Tigers.  Everyone knows the history of never winning another World Series after that.  They are now own by Ricks and they are in rebuilding mode, which is being rebuild by former GM of the Boston Red Sox.  Red Sox just like the Cubs went on a long just like the Cubs.

Wrigley Field History

The history of the Wrigley Field is just as rich as the Chicago Cubs.  Wrigley Field was home of the Chicago Whales of the Federal League when it opened back in 1914.  In  that year, the field was known as Weeghman Park.  When the Chicago Cubs moved into the field after the Federal League folded in 1916.  The field was called Cub Park.  It was renovated in 1937 and 1988.  It was expanded in 1922, 1927, and 2006.  To build this field, back in the day was $250,000 in 1914, which today will equal $5.73 million.  This field is one of the smallest in the league.

State of Wrigley Field Today

Today, the Chicago Cubs as a business is taking a hard look at Wrigley Field. They need to restore the field and they know it.  They are looking at putting up more Ads throughout the ballpark that the previous owners would not do.  They are also looking to put more signs behind the bleachers. The problem is the rooftops are complaining that it would block their views into the ballpark.  Does this sound wrong?  It is wrong because the Chicago Cubs only get a small percentage of the ticket sales from the rooftops.  The ads they could put up behind the bleachers would cover their small percentage that they get from the rooftops and more in about a season. The other problem is the neighborhood around Wrigley Field and it does not help that the field is a historical landmark.  The Ricks, who own the Chicago Cubs, would have to get permission from the state and the neighborhood to do anything in and around Wrigley.

In closing, I believe it would be best for the Chicago Cubs to move out of Wrigley Field.  This is the reason why.  They are profitable at Wrigley Field because it is a tourist event.  I am not saying that is the fan base.  They are getting most of their money from the box office.  They cannot put signs throughout the park because of the rooftop that are stealing the product on the field.  Yes, they are giving money to the Cubs but not at what the Chicago Cubs Could make on ads.  Yes, the Chicago Cubs could fix up the locker room, etc.  They want to make sure they can do everything not somethings.  I believe Rosemont deal will help the Cubs get what they want out of the City of Chicago and the neighborhood.  I believe you will see no more rooftops in the future if the Chicago Cubs stay at Wrigley Field.  I believe the Chicago Cubs will not be playing baseball in the city limits soon. I could be wrong. Please let me know what your thoughts are about this.  Go get some!  Drink it!  Enjoy it!  Metal it!  \m/

Cheers!

Bill DJ Weiser

Email:  djweiser13@comcast.net

Twitter:  @djweiser

New Beer Blog Goose Island Harvest Ale


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In this fall beer blog, we are going to take a look at one of the pioneers of the craft beer world in Chicago.  The beer and brewery are Goose Island Brewery and the beer is Harvest Ale, which replace their Oktoberfest two to three years ago.  Here is a belief history of this great Chicago Brewery.  The brewery started in 1988 by John Hall in Chicago, Illinois.  The first beer that was brew was their Honkers Ale, which is an English Style Ale.  Greg Hall, who is John Hall’s son, took over as a brewmaster and came up with this recipe for their Vintage Line, their winter seasonal, which is Mild Winter and several other brews.   Greg Hall stepped down as brewmaster when Goose Island was sold to AB InBev.  He is now making Cider, which is sold in Midwest only.  Let us get into the beer.

It has a clear dark copper color with a constant white head on the beer.  There is some fall earthly orange smell to the beer.  This Harvest Ale has a slight citrus to malty taste without an aftertaste.  It is pretty drinkable beer.

Here is a description from their website (www.gooseisland.com):

Brewer’s Notes:

Brewed in honor of the Harvest season this copper colored ESB is made with Cascade hops and the richest Midwestern malts. A fruity American hop aroma and a toasty malt character make Goose Island Harvest Ale an extra special beer worthy of your devotion.

Recipe Information:

Style: American Extra Special Bitter Alcohol by Volume: 5.7% International Bitterness Units: 35 Color: Copper Hops: Cascade Malts: 2 Row, Wheat, Caramel, Pale

Serving Suggestions:

Preferred Glass: Willi Food Pairings: Chicken, Pork, Turkey, Sausages Cheese Pairings: Cheddar, Aged Gouda Cellaring Notes: Enjoy within 180 days

Availability:

Seasonal (September-October) Bottles: 6, 12 & 24pks Draft: 1/6 & 1/2bbl

Great American Beer Festival Recognition:

Judging Category: Extra Special Bitter 2011: Bronze Medal

Here is their website and twitter addresses:

Website:  www.gooseisland.com

Twitter:  @gooseisland

In closing, I love the hoppy taste that is in this Extra Special Bitter.  This beer was design to have that when the trend was the over hop beers.  This beer gives you a nice balance from the hops and the malts.  This is not my favorite beer for the fall but I will at least enjoy a few six packs of it.  As a beer drinker, this brewery gives you two different Extra Special Bitters.  Fall is the hoppy one.  Mild Winter, which is their winter seasonal, will give you the next malt drinkable in the middle of the harsh winters.  Being a fall seasonal, I would go and get some soon! Drink it!  Enjoy it!  Metal it!  \m/

Cheers!

Bill Weiser

Email:  djweiser13@comcast.net

Website:  @djweiser

New Beer Blog Metropolitan Krankshaft


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In my 160th blog post, we are going to check out one of the newer breweries in the Chicago area that has popped up in the last 7 years.  The brewery I am talking about is Metropolitan and the beer is their Krankshaft.  Here is a little history on this brewery.  Metropolitan Brewery was founded in 2008 by Doug and Tracey Hurst in the Ravenswood Neighborhood of Chicago, IL.  Their beers are the German Style.  They brewery several different brews in the German Style.  Let us get into this beer.

Krankshaft is one of their everyday six-pack beers and is unique to see this style of beer be available everyday.  In most cases, brewery’s Kolsch is a Spring or Summer Seasonal.  It has a pale yellow color with a little white head on the beer.  It has a slight citrus smell.  It has a nice slight citrus taste and a nice dry crisp aftertaste.  It is very drinkable.

Here is a description from their website (www.metrobrewing.com):

Brewed in homage to the beer of Cologne, Krankshaft is a pale straw hued smile in a glass. We throw in a little wheat malt to round out an easy Santiam hop bitterness. There are no Köbes to serve them up, but you should feel free to have as many as you like.

Krankshaft Kölsch style beer goes great with fruit salad, sailing, pot stickers, graduation parties, gyros, kick ball, pistachios, cole slaw, Star Trek marathons, miso, rye vodka, canoeing, dinner waffles, dal, gelato, star gazing, popcorn, beach combing, barbeque, lawn chairs, chiles rellenos, muenster cheese, Black Jack, hummus & pita, pinball, guacamole, gardening, French Onion soup, and yoga.

Here is their website and twitter addresses:

Website:  www.metrobrewing.com

Twitter:  @metrobrewing

In closing, I was not a fan of this brewery at first because when they came out I was not into German Craft Beer Styles.  However, when they first started,  I still wanted to check them out anyways.  I did try them out and did not like their beers ar first.  I am just being honest, however, I tried their beers again of late.  Where I try this beer, I knew it was fresh because they tapped it right in front of me.  I wish they had a brewpub so I could try their all their beers.  I went to their website and I noticed  they do brewery tours.  I would love to get into one but it looks like they do not have any tours happening anytime soon.  I will be checking back to see if they have updates on more brewery tours.  This is one of the best Kolsch Craft Style that I have had in a long time.  It has a ton of flavor but the drinkablity like mass produce American Lager.  It has a better taste of course.  This beer could switch a ton of those American lager drinkers.  It is smooth and crisp but enough fruity notes to make the alehead happy.  Since I cannot get Schlafly Kolsch, I will be adding this my line up beers.   This is a great beer and I am happy that is Chicago Brewery is not copying what the other Chicago Craft Breweries are doing in the market.  I highly recommend this beer.  Go get some!  Drink it!  Enjoy it!  Metal it!  \m/

Cheers!

Bill DJ Weiser

Email:  djweiser13@comcast.net

Twitter:  @djweiser